YtX <TC

CCC CC

c<r cc cr

CCS cc ct «cs: c c «x ct

T CC '< c: ^

tc ■' <*:

^ c r <*r ^

r <cc or « > cc ^ ^ c

5- cc GC ^ ^

i cc ''fiC ^ c

i cc cC ^ s

(T <«r c cc

r <c

C Cc

I cc

C <J

.c CL jC C.

<s

Z-

tV' cr <sc c C cc

<xc c" cc ^ cCCLc

^ CC CC

•• «: cc « «. ct

CG cr ccC

c«rcc ‘f

ccC ■■■ C_<3C c c: c <c ^ CC C '

CC G ' 'C cccc ( C

cc ccc

CC CC CC cc'

cccc <C <L

e<L_C,C ccc c , c_c k:c cc cc c<r«Lc ccc <r cCCC CC « cc «CC c:*r «

C CCGC

f <C<CC ^ ^

< CC'CC ^ J

I c«:<cc ^ 5

c ccc c:c ^

0 c<ncc

« C<® CC ^ c c cc<^ ^ ^

C CC«iC cC cc <c cc CC ^ <G

cc CC^ cc^ cC. CC c;c«p cc <C <3

cc oc^cc cc c c C-c<e cc 5* c cC CCCC cc fC cc, cc c<^ cC « cc c CC cc <r

CC C^CC^

cc GCSC Cc CC CC

cC CC CCC CG

Ve cccccc cc

cc cc

'^fc

: cc V cc

;■ ^ 'c'aciarGjG C ^ GCCC«Cc CC CCL<'<p<^<i,

C «L CC^ c ec_ CO

c cc cc.

C ^ C£i- " c'^^ cc' ^ o

cec cc o

c cC cc c

C cC cc o

<r oc <n C

c c CC o C «jC cc C<_ cc c c«e_^ C <3C.<rc cc<^-

CC O CC'CC

crcei tc «; ,c c'l

' , cjC CCcc cc ^

cG dzcc (XI c<- ' cr cc c

CCGCCCC cc 5 f -

_ ^cC ccc CCCC c C cc

c ^ cc cccc cc cc C l

V ^ cc ccc cc « «

cr c <c cCCGG c

« c cc^^Vcc

c c c COX^

C cc

C<c c cc C c:

CC CL CC^

cc <C>C cc C%iCG cc cCcCC ccccc

^ lC cc

cc

or

oc

cc

cc

c<

cr

cc

cc .

ce

CG

CCLCCX^ c cc C CCCC f cC c «'CC<31 « cC^<-cc<rc ' C(T CC^rCOCC C C CCctCCG C C CC < cCCC c t CC(C€CC G c <LC^«S1C C

CL LC LC<^

CC ^ lCCC CCC ccrc- <X<C COC CC C ( cc

cc ( :C<3C CCC LC<

ccL «'cr cfc ccc

c «

«

«:

' c

« cc CC G cc CC C

CC G .tCC cc

(XC C' <1^ cc. rV lC'^,CL ^ ^!v<C

L It rt ' 'C i:.. .',uv_ . .

■o c « cccc c ^ c c cc ^ C LC cccc cc cc c c ^

^ c cf fc "c

^ ^ VC/ccc i L C _ .

C cc 'tec CCCC CL CL

^c lcccclc t c c e.

"''^VcVlC cefo^ /

cc cX CCCCC C' cC cc Vcc< <\<o « <t.

' c cccc cc ccc c c X-C

C:1,XC CCS cC-C

c

I C <C' 5S LC-V f > >7

LL-.SX«rCSC,C<

CJC.'C".C cc, .‘

o C 'ic <-<

C c lO <c

tc r< c n

clx^C'LC cc

•0'Cjt«, (f <-0 ^ v-C Cc <~ c

L C. .C cc ^<<< C X L CClCl'C <C<

G S'icIc 'G c

C cc L< C

CCLL . cc L

C «CC 'LL C C C

C <iE LC

XUS c

CLIC -Cf

c^.

' t c, C

>^(c r c >Z^c cc CX< cc C C L cc

C c L ecc

C X L cc c C CL CLC C > c cc c_

C C cc X

C C-Cc

^ c t, <• C<-

c CClCC X

c*^ c ^ CC*^ c*

c Op cc c

C CCLCC, C

c cc cc c

c cc c< c

c cc CO c c cc c c c

CCCCC

C cc 0 L c cc cc C cc L C C cc cc

. c <rc cL< C cc ( 0

. C cc fC

<L CC

C <L <C c <■ C C c LoCf C

CJ tt C'L C

cr c CL C <2: L cc

CC c

CL c

cc c _

XCC f t C" e Cl t C

:^L < L <X L C L^ C eCC

^fi< c ta V t c «fc o

XCL vL ^

ccc <( CC , cc L oc

<CL 'C CC ('

CC

•CXVLL

ccc c c <;

eCC c f>

; ^ I i

c L C <, ^ S t-

( C C < C : ( CC c C <:

CCC C c ccc L c x< CCC t C <0 CCCiC C<L )

X CC^L c_<‘i

_ ^ cc X < '.<-• a

L-.C C CCCCL C*!

^ CL «S

C C Cc LC CL C ^

l.v

. - ■“ to OL.<*0 L

(C or <3L OL LX rC CC <CC cc tC <v

>V H cc cC

cr CO oc < c <

rr cc xc OL L X

rc CC' Lire CO- ^

rr <Xc ecc cc cc

CC ( LCC LC LC

eras, c cc

l^c c

(«;■

CCX

tc;'7

(L c

r LCCa^^«X^

L oXXC C rC t CC<C(LlC c c< X^LC < L

>L CC XCCC L 0

'L0<^L^<‘<

_ cc ^ ^ 'C cc i XL CO

OL < L oc r CLC CC <r c <L oo c <r LL ^

C c sr <C

C < 'L CO < O L CO

«: c c co c c o oc C C 0 oc c c c cc

t C LC cC <& c < cc C c LC

cc L <0 <

c c C'LC

.0X0

< <ccc

' ecco ^(CCC

. , , ocCCC \ , c< cc C t eCCO

o lccl O V oc cc O' L L C o c c «'cC cc C(.(LCC cc C a ce cc f «CC cc a O C CCL

(tCC oc L^oC cc '

r , cco C CL

(LCC a (CC-C CC; »CC LC V fc r r i

■,t

w

L.

CC c C

L X

L C

X

L X

C ' «. <

<t '

X «

X ft XlL

X V.

X I

X

X

<■

i'f

r r , ^ V r c<Z^C CC

c \ ^ C -CCC c c <4. < ', ■« t < OCCfc c<r <S- r ’■ ^ ^ ' CC^<^ S < <T

1 ^ C ' ^ <3c<xrcc cs

t ^ c < cxrcc cr ct f ^ <r 1 cccc CC

C ^ C C Qp3CCC <S

<c; ^ <2.

c « f t CXXC CC <3C

< ^ c c_«^cc <x

CC <s

CC d

or. CC « CC CC CC

<X CC

CC c«r

-^CC CC

C«^ CC <_<c

corccor

<C

<L

CK'

^ c' CC Ct ' ft CC CC C /

CC C^ c CC CC c.

C C< c CC CC tc

% CC > CC CC C

<>

, <^^CCC c<

1 C^cccr cC c K^cccc «:

C c«cc CC

CC CSL,«cc cc_

CC « « C'<; <X

ct C<f ccc CC CC c^ccc cc

CC cCCCC cc cc dCCCCC cc

cc cetccc c<

' cc CCCCC cc ' Cc CCCCC cc cc CCCCC cc ' cc cccc cc va ec

c ccc CC-S‘ CC

c c c <c<r cc

<. c ct c <c cc Ci t C f cc,CC t

c or . <x cc ‘S c <rr orcrC cc C CC ' ccc cc (

C CC' cccx: CO

C C' cccc cc <

e C_ OCCC

«; ct 1 1

c cr c

ttv

^ tc cc <r t c ^

g g: ^

X, <2

c c^ cc

ccc cc

V c ^ C ^ ^

c c ^ c t <rc c^ . c c. t tv; t c t C cc <xc c <c C

, ^ c c t C c^C ccCt, ^

<fc C ^ C < ccccf c -C X

.'v t «L t c CCLcks t “C CT

<r«L < c c cc cc t cv c,

O <L < c <k: c C cc cc C -e -c

t c ^ C C CCC C C c

t < c c < c cc « c c <;

' " C cc C c. CCC C c -o C <3C c c CCC C Cc <z " C C CCC C C X ' C C cccc C C' c C c cccc c r- c: CcCC^CXC '

C'CX CCCC^^ X

d C ^ ^

X C £ cX cc cc

C C CCOXI- <C

X X ^cXCC CL

<C cc CC«rcC'C cc

X c ccCXC ' cc C X CCC cc (

X (T CCCXCC

CX ■>%c

f Xt

cc<

( C C

cc

%i

c <x c <x C CX

C cc <rx

C cc

cc

t,’

^c

C d

c OC cc

< GC

£ cc / « c cr c cc C CL c cr c cc c cc c cr c <r .

c cc

C cr

c cc

C Cc

C cc c .cc C C<

< c ct ' C ct

' C. Ct c <r Ct X cc CcV ' iC Cc cc c ( X cc

OC Cdcjc <rf Cd cc'

c <:^ <CcCcc‘ cC CX <d K c <xi ccr cc c. < c ^

^c^ X c C c X C ,

c ' c <s; c,c< c^ c< c

^ Tcl^cdCdcrVc 'c xV"

^cc^ccrccc cc <r

crc ccc« cc ctc X c CCC CXCXCc crcCc c SS cec C c

<-gcc rccx«

<■ ^ ‘«^L<JSL^ C t C! c^: o

X cr <;cc- <r cc X

X cc ^^^c*^C4

- VVv

^ » . cc cc a

c

X X _ X

rc

GC cc

. c cc

C C CX ^ c c cc xc c cc xc ccx

X C c cc xc < cc XC < tc XC CCC 'Crc CCC XC c cc

cc CCC .

XC CCC

ct c c<

Cf < rc

Xc

<CC CCC 'Cc c c(

<C< c (C

C< c ' <

Cc c c X CcC CCC(C

ct

C

X'C

X ■■

:Sc'S:^^,s,^-^c

«cxco cC ^ c _ r

'-'' C XXC'C t

' c d :-cct,'< t -

'•c XCC'C c X C

'CX^'C c X r

c cxc c c «: ^c c CXXC c-c' X / '

cc X xcc X c

'< C '^d c X o £ C»XC X c < X^CIC X C

^ X^XX C X c .

■'X^^S C X C!

c <jcc c cc

'C ^Ct< tc ^

L t45XX "Ct

^c C ccV cc

C XC tc CO t c orv< <c^ <

,C dV CC^ C

X Cc:c c cc X . tc XCC- c^ X:

c;c <r< Xc'

^ 4 c cc Xi'

cc <C>£ t cc

c

c cf C

c^tc cbc c :cX c c cer e c c XC ^ccee 'C CCX SCL ^ ^

C r

[ C

c <

( cc

X re

cccc L X

c

i

c c

£ cc

X

' X

rccr Ct X

c

r e

C C

ex

X

X

CCS C « X

O

i ■< I

ccr

rX

X <

x_

t'ceccx

C

i <

c c

CC

X

X

cg; c ex

c

c c

tc

X

X

c<rtci X

c-

1 c/

c c

cC

X

t X

c txc f: X

<r

' ( iC.

c <

ex

X

X

c«:c ':'X

c

•■ < '<■

c <

tc

<

X

exec X

or

■< <

re

C tc

X

X

exte-x

c

X eXCOX

X oxece C cxccx

X <rgt t X

cc

_X<i^XC X cc

X«^Ec C X ct C C C X

' CXfG t'C X t O X -CX < X,cc . C C <CtC ..c X cc r c cctc tc X cc cc tcrct c X ct

cc -eerr ,c < c cc cc c cc CC' - tC CCCCo c

cc CCC c

<; c CCC ' ' <c

cc CX<- tC

cc cC

<C ; vr ^ (Lcc <c

tj X ' cc^lx cc c X cr

cc

C4

EL re

X CC

rC

c re

cr.

it

X ec

Cf

Ct

c<

cc

C rC

d tt

t C cc cCCCi

C^C <X cCCX<

(. c X- cr<“

c < <c

C d COl^

C C <X CCC4 c « <y c«cc<

X . <r cc cccti

C :C X . «rc^

CCCXC

X «rcx

Cr CCCXfC

<c c<rc<c ct «rxc Ct 'ccrcx

Cc CCCCX Cc cc cc CCCCX Cc (CX X c c CCCCX cc <c c r 'Cexc cc tXtCrc cc X CdCX cc CCV X r cc

C CCC X c X CCC c c X CCC X <

:;tc <c c t ^

sc cCCC X '

X XCC^C ' ^ tc «r C d C CtCC X

. XCC c

■' ctcc c

Cc CC C '

Cc cc X -' '

X, cc C t « XC cc C >' V X CX C't

(X t'CXC GC.(Cd Cc tC(CCC X

cttcc rc o-

cr c^' " cc d tt

<kcm^ Cl s f $v

cc cccc^, r fcirccc c cC

*4Cf,

cc«tccc r X

tc cc < t d CCXC cc £C crccC cc ' C

tc cccc cc <■ <

rr <^CC cc c < ct «cr cc f c cr«ra cc £ c ct «c c cc t c CC<3CfC ct < c CtXCC cc C

gss g ' t' ^

cr fccc OC cr flrrc <r cr CCC ct

X c

c

C c

SiSi S(

. ‘gXt‘'V‘

XC r r r

' c^ >11

c d ee cc^

^ cl"

( C dTc. cr cr - C ^cr (CC

erxec XC cc

c tec ex XC ex c cere XC see

cc rcc, c ecC <Tc CC: c

XC se x X

XC « 'C (jcc

<L C CCi C cc<

dtr' X ,!-• il V. trrr<

cc cc.

r' or ~

CCC cc t <r cc cc C (C CX X r s cc X r « re

X r - CX C r < X «■ r c or

C Cc cc

xri c

_ . X< <: X

..cc c X

vSr d X

. C C c

rc c c X

ec c' c

#/- c ^ X

d CCC cc C<I.C

cc 'f

cetr

XC-r

ccr cere

XXfC XC C

' crc _ _

etc exc cec eCc cec <c

X etc cX'

X XCC « C

X X' c c xt

c: c ccct

X X cc c

C ccccce

d Cfecc e< ■• c<

R.C.P. EDINBURGH LIBRARY

R53760A0236

Documents on Medical Antheopology

ANTHROPOLOGY

OBSERVATrONS ON THE ESOTERIC

MaDoers and Customs of Semi-Civilized Peoples;

BEING A

RECORD OF THIRTY YEARS’ EXPERIENCE IN

ASIA, AFRICA, AMERICA and OCEANIA.

By a French Army-Surgeon.

{IN TWO VOLUMES) VOL. II

[AH Rights Reserved]

PARIS

Librairie de Medecine, Folklore et Anthropologie

13 Faubourg Montmartre, 13 1898

■■

f -

t.

k:

i

UNTRODDEN FIELDS

OF

ANTHROPOLOGY

No physical or moral misery, no sore however corrupt it may be, should frighten him who has devoted himself to the Knowledge of Man ; and the sacred Ministry of the Medical Man by forcing him to witness everything, also pe''mits him to say every- thing.”

Tardieu, Des Attentats aux Mceurs.

Tc ykp OC7T07TVI'JXl XXKSTTOV <pU7£0g, yjv £%f/ TIC xsL

Aristophanes (Vesp. 1457):

“The decomposition of dead bodies v/e can well prevent, can we not also stay the decomposition of the human heart? If the weak know, if we know, that a given vice has a bad taste, and ‘turns but to dead ashes in the Mouth’, with what happiness should we fly from it. It is only necessary to see certain phases of degradation such as they really are, to hold them afterwards in hatred.”

Adele Esquiros, Les Marcliandes d’ Amour.

Xass uns, geliebter :ffiruber, nlcbt vergessen,

Base von 6tcb selbst bev /Iftcnecb nlcbt scbclben bann.

Goethe (Torq. Tasso, I, 2, 85).

Documents on Medical Anthropology

OBSERVATIONS ON THE ESOTERIC

Manners and Customs of Semi-Civilized Peoples;

BEING A

RECORD OF THIRTY YEARS’ EXPERIENCE IN

ASIA, AFRICA, AMERICA and OCEANIA.

By 'A French Army-Surgeon.

{IN TWO VOLUMES) VoL. II

{AH Rights Reserved]

PARIS

Librairie de Medecine, Folklore et Anthropologie

13 Faubourg Montmartre, 13 1898

PREFATORY NOTE

TO THE SECOND VOLUME

Dont ne m’a retarde I’opinion de ceux qui disent que c’est une chose vergogneuse et sale de traicter de cette matiere, et que la lecture d’un tel livre peut induire quelque lihidineux desir en la peusee de ceux qui le liront. Mais nul ne le lise qui n’en aura a faire. Nous desirons empescher le mal; si, ce faisant, nous ne pouvons fuir le scandale volontairement pris, cela ne nous doit pas etre impute, ains a la pernicieuse Yolonte de ceux qui d’eux-memes cherchent a se scandaliser sans sujet.”

Dr. JAQUES DUVAL.

Traite des Hermaiihrodites.

(Rouen, 1612, p. 58.)

'‘Sciie est nescire, nisi 1& me scire alius sciret.”

PREFATORY NOTE

TO THE SECOND VOLUME.

The following letter, received from a valued correspondent, is so just, and defines our Author’s elfort with such precision, that we think it of sufficient interest to reproduce. Others were sent to us, many of them couched in very appreciative and laudatory terms. We hope to include them all in a third supplementary volume to appear later.

Sir,

In reply to your request to contribute any criticisms one wishes upon Untrodden Fields of Anthropology by A French Army-Surgeon (published 1896), although I have not resided abroad, nor can claim any special knowledge of the subject, as a medical man, and having read the work very carefully, I should like to make the following general remarks. The title at once arrests the scientific attention and the book leads one straight into fields untrodden as far as I am aware at all events little more than a note here and there appears in the standard anatomical, physiological, or anthropological works; in its purely psychological aspects I believe it is wholly untreated. The author’s numerous observations on the various races and species of mankind, with which his position brought him into contact ; the careful

X

PREFATORY NOTE.

differentiations he details in the several species and races, and the rough classification he sketches therefrom, are very interesting; while his description of relevant and characteristic customs, of the different races, and the incidents of travel in passing from place to place are equally attractive. The scientific aspects of the work are very interesting, but the details of the examples, brief, and in general scientific terms. From the purely scientific side it would he probably too much to look for the scientific minutiae of Darwin, or numerous and exact measurements, under the - circumstances of the compilation of the work and the newness of the subject as a speciality. The illustrations to the work are excellent. In my opinion it would have been better had they been annexed to the matter of the text, or if separated, they should have been bound in uniform size as the volumes. As many notes on the distinguishing characteristics of the male organs of generation in the various races appear in the text, some typical illustrations of them would seem a natural part of the illustrations, whereas they are absent. A further advantage to the illustrations would» I think, be, to draw them to scale; either as a whole, or the particular scale, given at the foot of each plate. Lastly I think it is to be regretted that as a work treating of a scientific subject, and further as being a speciality, it is not announced to and procurable by the scientific world through the ordinary channels. Apologising for these brief criticisms and congratulating the author on what he has achieved.

Yours faithfully,

“MEDICUS.”

England, Sept. 1897.

Our friend’s name is withheld, as desired.

EDITOR’S NOTE

I regard sex as the central problem of life. And now that the problem of religion has practicall}' been settled, and that the problem of labour has at least been placed on a practical foundation, the question of sex with the racial questions that rest on it stands before the coming generations as the chief problem for solution. Sex lies at the root of life, and we can never learn to reverence life until we know how to understand sex.

Havelock Ellis.

Nature and truth, though never so low or vulgar, are yet pleasing when openly and artlessly represented.

Pope.

EDITOR’S NOTE TO THE FOREGOINO

My correspondent is in error in thinking that the First Edition Untrodden Fields of Anthropology was not procurable by the scientific world through the ordinary channels.” The work was duly advertised and announced in 1896, for three months before and three months after it appeared, in the following medical Reviews and literary Magazines amongst many others:

The Medical Press and Circidar The Lancet" . ^ The Edinburgh Medical Journal". “The Glasgow Medical Journal". “The Bristol Medico-Chirurgical Journal". “The Birmingham Medical Beview" .

“The Homeopathic World". “The Athenceum". “The Academy". “Pall Mcdl Gazette" .—“ Globe" .

The prospectus announcing the work was sent to a large number of London medical men in practice and to the Fellows of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland ; and the work was regularly supplied, on demand, to the London medical publishers, whose clients had ordered a copy of it through them.

With regard to the illustrations, I feel compelled to admit that the observations of Medicus have consider- able raison d'Mre. But it was here that both Editor and Author were most anxious not to give offence by transgressing the bounds of propriety. Few things occasion

XIV

EDITOR S NOTE.

more trouble and expense, in the production of any given work, than the illustrations, and more especially did we feel this in connection with a work dealing specifically with the arcana of anthropological science. The Author, it is true, had the intention, at the outset, to reproduce in the text some original drawings which he had executed during his medical experiences in the Colonies, but, on more mature consideration, it was agreed that the illustrations in question would be more appropriate to another important work, for which the Doctor has been collecting material during the last twenty-five years.

This treatise, which will deal from an Anatomical, Physiological and Philosophical standpoint, with the Crimes and Follies of Humanity, having, the Sexual Instinct for their fons et origo, will review and, in some instances, combat the theories of the German School (with Dr., R. von Krafft-Ebing en tete), in reference to the Psychopathia Sexualis. No more need be said here of this work, which, when it shall appear, will undoubtedly command the attention of the Medical and Anthropological world.

The Author requests me to say again that he will be glad to receive and consider any legitimate criticisms on the subjects dealt with in “Untrodden Fields of Anthropology”, providing they be couched in proper language and regarded from a scientific point of view.

CHARLES CARRINGTON.

Paris, February 2Ist, 1898.

CONTENTS

OF THE

SECOND VOLUjME

1

SECOND ENLARGED AND REVISED EDITION

ANALYTICAL

TABLE OP CONTENTS

PART THE THIRD

Prefatory Note to the Second Volume ix

Editor’s Note to the foregoing xin

Table of Contents' xvii— xxiv

AFRICA

Senegal and the South Rivers

Chapter I.

Sent to Senegal. Arrival at Saint Louis. General impression of the Senegal coast.— A few words about tlie town of Saint Louis. The Black Town. Anthropological characteristics of the Wolof race. The beauty of tlie young Negress. Operation performed on the breasts of women lying-in.— The genital organs of Negroes. Rapes and other offences against modesty amongst Creoles and Negroes. [Page 1

Chapter II.

Various races besides the Wolofs. Mussulmans and Fetishists. - The Toucouleur.— The Peulh. The Sarrakholais. The civilisa- tion of the White man has no effect on the character of the Black. Tlie Kassonke. The young Kassonke girl.- The Malinkds and Bambaras.— The Senegalese sharpshooter. [Page 27

XVII

XYIil

CONTENTS

Chaptee III.

Social condition, and moral characteristics of the Negro race in general.— The Chiefs and Marabouts.— Free men, griots, and blacksmiths.— The Griot village of Erina. Slaves.— The slavery question.— Moral characteristics of the Black. The Black’s opinion of the civilised Toubab. Karamoko’s carbine.— Various customs and superstitions common to the people of Senegal. —Mussulman amulets and the fetish man’s “grigris”. [Page 39

Chapter IV.

The Negro woman.— Her social condition.— Marriage.— The wife purchased by the husband. Vanity of the women who fetch high prices.— Marriage ceremonies. Constancy of the Negress. The wives of the Sharpshooters. Their inconstancy.— Their virtues. Polygamy amongst the Blacks. The chief mistress of the house. —Jealousy unknown to the Negress.— Divorce.

[Page 49

Chapter V.

The hymen.— Large and small lips.— Clitoris. —The fork and the navel. - A study of the genital organs of the Negro races of Africa. Marks of virginity in the young girl. Circumcision of young girls. The festival of same. The nubile Negress.— The genital organ of the Negro. The perforated Kabylo woman.— Circumcision the probable cause of the size of the Negro’s penis. The effect of circumcision on the size of the penis of the pubescent boy. Mantegazza on the genital organs of the Negroes.— His opinion on circumcision. The incontestable advantages of this operation. The suppression of masturbation in the circumcised. The festival of circumcision amongst Fetish worshippers.— Excursus by Dr. Godard on the defloration of virgins in Egypt. Sir K. F. Burton on Dahomeyan customs. Female infanticide. Thibetan nuptial customs.— The Hottentot “Apron”. The perforation of the penis amongst Australian tribes. [Page 65

CONTENTS

XIX

Chapteu VI.

Erotic dances of the Senegal Xegroes. The Anamalis fobil and the bamboula " of the Wolofs. The belh’ dance of the Landounians of Eio Nunez. Obscene dance of the massacre of the wounded, and mutilation of the dead, on the field of battle.— The Gourou or Kola nut, the aphrodisiac of the Negroes.

[Page 109

Chapter VIT.

Sexual intercourse of the Negro races. Sensitiveness of the race.— Contempt of the Negress for the White man.— The usual method of copulation.— Prolonged duration of copulation in the Negro.— Circumcision as a potent cause of delay in spending.— The unimportance of the signs of virginity in the Negress. Negro girls deflowered by Toubabs.— Amorous subterfuges used in Europe. Artifices used by Asiatic peoples. Former American customs. Report of Carletti, the Traveller. Savage habits regarding perfumes. Tumefaction of the gland. Influence of chastity on health. —Elements of social science. Dr. Yerga on celibacy. [Page 117

Chapter VIII.

Perversions of the sexual passion amongst the Negroes. The Negress is neither a Sodomite nor a Lesbian. -Parent-Duchatelet on “Lesbian Love”. Tribads despised by other prostitutes.— How the vice is contracted. The strange affection of Tribads. Lawful love thought .shocking. Pregnancy frequent among them. Masturbation and pederasty very rare amongst the Negroes. A Black Mes.salina.— The Black man’s lust for the White woman. A White Mes.salina. A White woman violated by a Negro.— Taylor on raping adult women. Evidence of signs of violence.— Trick of a Negro to get a White woman.— A little White girl deflowered by a Negro. [Page 155

Chapter IX.

Differences between the organs of generation of the various races of Senegal. [Page 189

XX

CONTENTS

PART THE FOURTH

OCEANIA

New Caledonia— The New Hebrides— Tahiti

Chapter I,

My stay in New Caledonia. Anthropological characteristics of the Kanaka of New Caledonia. The Kanaka “Popinee”.— Degraded condition of the Popinee.— The genital organs of the Kanaka race.— Circumcision at the age of puberty.- Seclusion of girls at puberty. Hunting the Snake ”.— Beating as a means of purification. Woman during the menstrual period. The Kanaka virgin. Division of the Kanaka race into independent and hostile tribes. The man’s manou ”. Strange modesty of the Kanaka. —The girdle of the Popinee.— A few words about manners and customs.— The position of the Chief in the social state. Habitations.— Food.— The Kanaka stove. Beliefs and superstitions. The wizard-doctor (Takata). —Prof. Frazer on “Killing the God”. [Page 191

Chapter II.

Moral characteristics of the Kanaka. Causes of the insurrection of 1878. The Kanaka’s courage. His weapons. The attack on the post at Foa. Heroic death of sixteen warriors.— Ferocity of the Kanaka.— The philosophy of man-eating. Devourers of their own offspring. Men eaten to win glory.— Anthropophagy a motive for war. Dogs v. women at Terra del Fuego. Flagrante delicto of animality.— Cannibalism. Its causes. The pilou-pilou ”. The erotic pilou-pilou ”. Scenes of cannibalism. —The massacres of the Alcmena”, and la Poya. The Chief’s part in the feast of human flesh. The reward of the French Government. [Page 230

CONTENTS

XXI

Chapter III.

Forms of sexual intercourse amongst the Kanakas.— The Popine'e the property of the Chief. The Kanaka marriage.— Polyandry. The condition of the Popinee.— The Kanaka break wood ”, the usual method of copulation. Accouchement. Vulvar deformities produced by the repeated coition of the Kanaka Popinees. An original form of punishment for adultery.— Not confined to the Kanakas.— Mrs. Potiphar and Joseph. Lust of the Kanaka for the White woman. The head chief Atai and Mme F***.

TPage 252

Chapter IV.

Perversions of the sexual passions amongst the Kanakas. The perversions of the Popinees.— Pederasty after the age of puberty. A curious theory of sexual aberration. The symptomatic characteristics of the pederasty of the Kanaka. Cruelties and erotic mutilations' committed by the Kanakas during the insurrection.— White women beheaded and violated. Bechir, the Arab.— Louis, the Kanaka interpreter. Acts of Sadism. The mutilation and outraging of corpses. [Page 268

Chapter V.

The convict in New Caledonia. The motives for this chapter.— The Penitentiary of Nou Island. The convict as a family servant.— The ticket-of-leave man. The convent of Bourail.— Lesbians and fellatrices Tribadism in Europe. —Tribads are not Sapphics.— The Courtesans of Greece.— Lombroso on the causes of this vice. Natural wantonness.— Environment as a factor.— Secret clubs of vice. —Advanced age, another cause.— Disgust born of excess. Congenital tendency. The criminality of husbands.— The military post at Bourail.— The General’s cap.— “Jc m’emmerde, and I want a man ".—Marriage of liberated convicts. Sodomy and pederasty amongst the convicts.— Prisons as breeder of vice.— The universality of the vice.— Infamous passions. [Page 297

XXII